Thursday, February 12, 2015

Introducing the new beauty must-have that's as cheap as chips...potatoes! 

Like many women, I spend a sizeable chunk of my income on moisturisers, facial scrubs, spot-zapping creams and anti-ageing serums.

But none of them, however pricey, seem to work the promised miracles. I’ve long been tempted to adopt a more natural — and, crucially, cheaper — beauty regime, so I am delighted to discover the latest must-have for beauty devotees is, the, er, potato.
The humble spud is said to fight spots, even out skin tone, de-bag eyes and even cover grey hairs, according to natural beauty bloggers. So, are any of these tips worth their chips?
JUICE TO PLUMP UP YOUR SKIN
Every morning for a fortnight, I put two or three medium raw potatoes into a juicer and glug them down. You have to mix the juice well and it’s best to drink it straight away rather than leaving it in the fridge.
I got through a lot of potato varieties: King Edwards, Maris Pipers, Red Desirees and Rosevals. The juice tasted vile, like earth mixed with water, but I persevered. To see what effect potatoes had on my skin, I didn’t make any other changes to my diet or beauty regime.
It’s an old wives’ tale that raw potatoes are poisonous, but they can cause bloating, so go carefully. Avoid green or sprouted potatoes, which do contain toxins.
Raw is said to be the best way to get the health benefits of potatoes because some vitamin C content is lost in the cooking process, but no one wants to eat uncooked potato, so it’s easier to knock back a glass of juice.
PULP THEM TO KILL SPOTS
Potato juice is supposed to reduce inflammation and irritation, including spots, ulcers, bruises and rashes.
I wanted it to get rid of some stubborn spots, but I wasn’t sure how to apply the juice.
I started off by dabbing it on with cotton wool pads, like a toner. My spots failed to vanish.
Pulping potatoes is supposed to reduce inflammation and irritation, including spots, ulcers, bruises and rashes

‘There is emerging evidence that they play a role in cell function and reducing inflammation, so these benefits may extend to the skin. Anything fresh is likely to contain higher levels of nutrients and increased concentrations of vitamin C, which is an essential component of healthy skin.
‘Potatoes also contain vitamin B6, which helps process amino acids — the building blocks of the skin. Potato peel is particularly high in vitamins and minerals, so make sure you keep the skin on.’

MASH TO SMOOTH AWAY CROWS' FEET
I follow the instructions of the online natural beauty gurus and make a face mask of grated potato, skin and all, mixed with the juice of one lemon, and leave it on for ten minutes.
It feels soothing and much nicer than many expensive face masks. I’m sure I can feel my skin tightening beneath it and I hope it is lightening blemishes and scars.
Make a face mask of grated potato, skin and all, mixed with the juice of one lemon, and leave it on for ten minutes

Make a face mask of grated potato, skin and all, mixed with the juice of one lemon, and leave it on for ten minutes
But will it really plump out my wrinkles and smooth away my crows’ feet?
Dr Wedgeworth says: ‘Vitamin C will help protect the skin from ageing environmental damage. The antioxidant content in potatoes will also absorb and block the activity of free radicals, which are believed to harm cells, ageing skin. However, the vitamin C and antioxidants may not be in the right concentration to be effective.
‘The skin is good at blocking out molecules, so it may not penetrate the skin. Companies spend billions working out the right formula to ensure that the right minerals do get absorbed, while there’s been no research on whether potato juice, or pulp, can adhere to the skin and have any effect.’
USE THE PEEL TO GET RID OF GREY HAIR
It seems unlikely that potatoes can lighten the skin and darken grey hair, but since my greys have started multiplying faster than I can pluck them out, I’m more than happy to have a go.
The natural beauty websites recommend boiling up the peel from five large potatoes with two litres of water, letting it simmer for up to 30 minutes and then discarding the peel.
Boil up the peel from five large potatoes with two litres of water, let it simmer and then discard the peel and apply the potato-skin water to your hair while washing 

Boil up the peel from five large potatoes with two litres of water, let it simmer and then discard the peel and apply the potato-skin water to your hair while washing 
After washing and conditioning your hair as normal, you pour on the murky, potato-skin water (or you can apply it with a paintbrush) and then rinse it out after 20 minutes.
The science behind this is hazy, but it’s worth a try. So I tried the potato peel hair treatment after washing my hair every four days as normal. Afterwards, I smell slightly of potato, but the scattering of grey hairs along my parting seems less obvious and, best of all, my hair is softer and silkier.


2 comments :

  1. As for me....Potato is for my Pot...hehehe

    ReplyDelete
  2. Are you kidding me? lol...that's my lunch! hehehee

    ReplyDelete